Blog

Jul 2, 2013

1st cucumber harvest

reblog

May 10, 2013

Dog’s day night at (mt)

reblog

Apr 23, 2013

(mt) Media Temple: People We Support at SXSW

mediatemple:

image

We’ve built some great relationships with clients and like minded creative builders over beers, coffee and passionate chit chat. SXSW embodies a lot of what we do at (mt), which by no coincidence, is why we’ve been coming here for 8+ years. The following is a list of companies at SXSW…

Just an example of the liveblog content we were throwing up at SXSW

1 note reblog

Apr 23, 2013

The SXSW Cycle and Survival

Maybe you’re a marketing person, an entrepreneur or just a person really interested in  totally overwhelming conference experiences, SXSW is probably on your agenda.

SXSW emulates this massive wave, sucking up energy from all things tech and culture for months leading up the event, only to crest and crash in a loud chaotic mess on Austin, TX in March. In reality, the event is so large, it’s something we’re working “around” all year long.

The SXSW planning cycle:

Post SXSW Spring :

  • Complete brain drain followed by SXSW recap meetings and post-press analysis.

  • Answer questions from your executive team about hotel room cost, activation opportunities, what others did and what we could do better.

Summer time:

  • Focus on all things not SXSW, recharge and enact fun creative strategies.

  • Have a discussion about Not doing SXSW followed by a discussion entitled: Maybe we should book rooms now?

Fall:

  • We should start discussing SXSW budget and really look into booking hotels

  • Should we get our own lounge venue for a week?

Winter:

  • Next year budget planning sparks the big question: “Did we book rooms yet?”

Late Winter:

  • Shit, What are we putting on our SXSW Mini site? What’s the budget and theme  again?

Tips to Survive SXSW and keep on improving.

Tame the Guerilla:

SXSW is synonymous with “Guerilla Marketing”. It’s really taken to extremes in Austin with companies spending a good portion of $1M to produce elaborate, multi-day installations complete with custom built vehicles, you name it. These can be very impactful, powerful foils for your brand if done “right”. Just make sure your “activation” actually connects you with customers and scales with your business and objective. If you’re there to close deals, do something small. If you’re there to drive volume downloads on your app, go a bit bigger. If you’re pepsi, buy a city block and hire Justin Timberlake.

Pay the Piper:

It’s hard to imagine the nice people behind SXSW, an event that actually utilizes crowdsourcing and celebrates creativity, going after free-loaders using the SXSW brand to launch the next big thing, but they do, and rightfully so. After working at SXSW for a couple years as a full-time staffer, you quickly understand this is an organization dedicated to creating a unique and highly valuable experience for attendees. The brand juice associated with that experience is immense and should be filtered through the proper SXSW channels to limit the chaos to some sort of sane threshold. Find a way to work through the event to produce your initiative and your event will absolutely be more successful.  Having SXSW in your corner is a big help.

Have Appropriate Goals:  (it’s about connections)

The SXSW Success metric should look something like this:

*New People Met social network interactions

x % increase in social engagements

——————————————————

reactions to original content created  x emails garnered through content publishing 

= Potential infographic for the masses showing your awesomeness long lasting, ongoing brand engagements

*Customers, Potential customers, inspirational characters, colorful characters

Obviously, I’m not a mathematician, but put this on the wall at MIT and I bet the marketing version of Will Hunting would get it.

Connect with Clients:

Chances are you’ll be competing with other organizations and people to meet with your clients and important contacts. Make it easy and appealing to connect. Have several “meet ups” making it optional to drop in for a catch up. Eventually you’ll make that meeting and

Stalk your favorite companies and E-Celebs:

SXSW is a pretty amazing opportunity to ask your technorati crush that question you’ve always wanted to ask them. Chances are, you’ll find said nerd approachable and happy to chat. Just be patient (but persistent).

Stay Sane by producing content.

Stay limber and somewhat sober: It’s easy to over-do it in Austin. If you’re producing  multiple events and hitting others’ events to-boot, keep some simple goals in mind like, “I need to be in hotel room by 12:30 SHARP to produce some decent content for the next day”. I spent years not following this advice and finally found the content production angle to be not only centering, but a fun way to share your experience and share knowledge. It’s a huge that producing content on the ground at SXSW serves as fantastic archive for next years SXSW planning shenanigans.

Thanks, and see you in Austin in that magical month of March, where worlds collide, weather wreaks havoc and the chaff and the wheat are crushed together in a delicious techno-social taco. (with a vegan shell)








reblog

Mar 1, 2013

Build/test SXSW Live Blog

reblog

Feb 21, 2013

reblog

Jan 24, 2013

Offscreen Magazine Features Brad

virb:

image

Our Virb Founder and CEO Brad Smith has been featured in the latest edition of Offscreen Magazine, a beautifully crafted magazine that tells the real stories of people who work in the web industry. He’s not only their handsome cover model, but, inside, you can read more about his story—from growing up in Missouri to moving to NYC and starting a little company called Virb. You can pick up a copy in certain cities or order one from Offscreen’s website. Well done, Brad!

18 notes reblog

Jan 22, 2013

The 10gen Blog on MongoDB and NoSQL: MongoDB: From early adopter to mainstream enterprise

This trend resonates universally.

10gen:

One of the best things about industry innovation right now is that virtually none of the best technology is emerging from the bowels of some corporate R&D department. It’s coming from real companies solving real problems of scale, among other things, and often from web companies like Google and…

1 note reblog

Jan 4, 2013

El Porto over-head. Ate my lunch.

reblog

Jan 3, 2013

Service Marketing before Community Marketing

Two key components in any successful brand are service experience and community presence. Having these components co-exist in an organization will produce genuine experience for your clients, even if a core service or product disappoints, having a community minded service team will keep a brand in good graces of your clients.

Your service team is the cornerstone of your community experience whether it’s online support, brick and mortar retail service or food service.

  • Mirror the culture of your clientele with your service people. If your clients are into unicorn illustration, you should have awesome unicorn enthusiasts working service!
  • Be where your clients want you. If your clients are prone to use online chat support, have real chat support. If they are people that don’t use the internet, have a great phone and in-person service system.
  • Once your service experience is creating positive Word of Mouth, support the service arm with targeted community marketing efforts like special events, product demonstrations, and customer promotions incorporating interesting engagement.
Keep the client experience in your core value system, execute with nuance and enthusiastic growth will follow!

reblog

Jan 3, 2013

The 2 R's of Content

Respect and Relate to the user!

Whether you’re creating content for your passion blog or a professional blog, make sure your language isn’t just “categorical”. In the advent of the content explosion audiences have been broken into super niches making it tempting to create for a category, overlooking the individual “user”.

Individuals, more now than ever are driving content distribution. Products and content channels are providing experiences tailored for individuals, respecting the users’ interest.

It’s going to be more important than ever to relate to users by respecting their interests and time.

Two production themes to pay attention to when addressing the two R’s:

Tone: No matter the subject, be it financial news, startup gossip or design tutorials, the consumer of content will be an individual with human needs, problems and goals. Keep it human and conversational. This is something that takes constant work and attention.

Brevity: If at all possible, keep it short. Respecting a user’s time by condensing content may be one of the most important virtues in content production. Brevity may seem to contrast being conversational, but rise to the challenge to produce friendly and brief pieces and you’ll be rewarded with more eye balls and readers.

1 note reblog

Nov 26, 2012

From the top of Red Rock, Las Vegas.

reblog

Oct 30, 2012

Wall of font at the Hammer Museum

reblog

Oct 29, 2012

There is a lot to be said for the difference between planning for six months, developing for a year, learning that your users don’t want to pay for something, pivoting, starting over on development, and having your investors clean you out, as opposed to launching an open-ended, simple, and small version of a great product in which users tell you exactly what they’re willing to pay for while they’re already paying you.

(via executebook)

3 notes reblog

Oct 26, 2012

We’re excited to be supporting this project. A book in 7 days? Only Drew Wilson.

1 note reblog

Aug 20, 2012

The Virb Blog: Virb Turns Two!

virb:

Can you believe that Virb is already two? As we enter our third year, we want to thank everyone who has supported Virb (shout out to the old social network members!) and helped us get to this point. We’re growing and moving—crazy fast—but it was a really exciting year so we want to make sure…

36 notes reblog

Aug 13, 2012

Laughing Squid is one of those blogs that keeps you coming back because it’s simple, endlessly entertaining and an oddity as a business blog. I’m not claiming it wins as a hosting blog, you wouldn’t know it’s curated content of a hosting company. Working on the content strategy at (mt), I don’t think we could get away with it. All commentary aside, kudos and Welcome Justin Page, New Contributing Writer at Laughing Squid.

Laughing Squid Links 

34 notes reblog

Aug 13, 2012

pnkeatingla:

Day in Venice 🍴☀🌴 #pnkeatingla #la #food #venice #pokepoke #foodporn (Taken with Instagram at Poke-Poke)

1 note reblog